Successful 5th GA Meeting in Palma de Mallorca

The first face-to-face meeting after 2 years of the pandemic, took part from 6-8 April 2022 in Palma de Mallorca. It was a full success: Besides lots of fruitful discussions and catching up on the enormous progress made in all work packages, we mainly enjoyed and scientifically benefited from finally meeting in person again! What a beautiful location.

24 January 2022 – Mental health in Covid times

How has the Covid-19 pandemic affected our mental health? Moreover, are we able to bounce back from this? Answers to these questions come, at least in part, from the DynaMORE project. Read the full interview with various resilience researchers, including our scientific coordinator Prof. Raffael Kalisch, in the European Science-Media Hub.

18 January 2022- 7th Newsletter

The project’s 7th newsletter is out: Have a look and learn more about DynaMORE’s progress, awards team members received, new publications, upcoming events, a new SEAB member, and more!

OUR VISION

We are a multidisciplinary team of researchers with the joint goal of developing an in silico model of stress resilience. To do so, we monitor healthy at-risk individuals (18+ years old) during stressful life phases, such as transition into adulthood or higher education, training-to-street transition (police officers), or abruptly changed life situations (accident victims in recovery). Multiple longitudinal studies collect psychological, behavioural, neural, and physiological markers, and apply advanced mathematical modelling to identify key risk indicators and resilience factors. The ultimate goal is a prognostic tool for people to monitor their mental stability, and to intervene effectively before the personal „tipping point“.

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WHY IT MATTERS

To this date, each year, more than half a billion people in the world are affected by anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, or addiction. These conditions often occur as a consequence of stressors, such as traumatic events, challenging life circumstances, strenuous transition phases, or physical illness. In Europe alone, stress-related disorders are believed to cause direct and indirect economic costs of about 200 billion € every year. Despite ample research efforts into the cause of these disorders, the burden on affected individuals and society as a whole has further grown. We believe that, instead of focusing on  disease, we need to understand what keeps us healthy.

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